Clerkenwell Design Week

Decorating, Exhibitions, Experiences, Interior Design, interiors, lighting, Soft furnishings

This past week has been the industry hotbed that is Clerkenwell Design Week.  I spent a day perusing the offerings, and some of these products caught my eye:

LIGHTING:

The lighting show was held in Fabric nightclub, which meant that they could be displayed brilliantly.  There were a lot of ‘repeat’ concrete shades around, but a few designs stood out:

 

This beautiful light by Lomas Furniture has a shade of pierced ceramic and looks like the moon…

More lighting which caught my eye came from Pad Home.  This was totally organic in shape, made from cardboard and reminded me of large wasps nests (in a beautiful way)…

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CERAMICS:

I found some gorgeous surface textures at Solus, some were slate with what looked like lasered patterns on them:

 

They also had gorgeous 3D hexagonal tiles, and can supply simple ones in a huge range of colours.

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BATHROOMS:

The highlight of my visit was finding this sink, however the price tag is eye watering .. it is the Brockway by KOHLER.

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It comes as 1/2 or 3 tap sizes, and reminds me of a cattle trough.  Prices in the UK where I can find it are £2K plus, so maybe not for now… I am devastated!  Maybe I can convert a real cattle trough instead?

 

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I also saw this beautiful building in Clerkenwell, it looks like Fred Flintstone built it with rough hewn stone frontage in areas.  Absolutely smitten!

Tiling A Fireplace

Decorating, DIY, Makeover, Upcycling

This is a really quick way to update a fireplace without having to rip out an existing one.   This fireplace surround will eventually be replaced, but until then it is a fast makeover to make it less hideous!  Some tiles and paint can transform it into a much better looking feature.  I wanted to brighten it up and use some sort of patterned rustic moroccan style tiles in the inside area of the fireplace.

HOW TO DO IT:

This is the starting point; a pine surround with bricks inside and an insert real flame gas fire.  The house is in a city with smoke control laws, so it is a practical feature and seemed silly to rip it out.

STEP BY STEP GUIDE:

Start by painting out the orange pine with a primer and then eggshell paint.  I used a water-based version by Dulux in white which dries fast and is re-coatable in 2 hours. It took 3-4 coats to get rid of the orange wood.

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Next, measure the area you want to tile.  The side areas of brick were really slim, so I needed to find tiles that were quite small as cutting up large scale patterned ones would have jarred on the eye.  I hunted high and low, but all the tiles I found were large scale patterns and I was beginning to give up when I wandered into a high street tile shop and found these 10x10cm tiles.

They come in a faded grey and green and are from a selection of about 7 patterns which mix well together. I went for these two colours mixed up.  Even better, I managed to grab the sample tiles for just 50p each instead of having to buy them in the large amount they usually are sold in for £50.  I only needed about 26 tiles, so it cost just £13.  I LOVE a bargain!

I worked out a basic pattern, and started to cement the full sized centre tiles on first with tile adhesive.  Once I needed to start cutting tiles I measured the size I would need and used a water-jet tile cutter.  You can hire these if you don’t have your own.  They are really easy to use, although quite noisy.  Luckily I could cut tiles in half and use them down the sides and across the top and they fitted perfectly.

 

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This tile cuter is easy to use and fast

Use tile spacers if working on a vertical wall.  Here are the tiles going up..

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Once the whole area is tiled, leave it overnight to set hard.  Then grout the tiles.  I used a ready-mixed grout in white, and a grout spreader to fill it into the spaces in the main area.  In tight corner areas I just pushed it into the gaps with my fingers.  To get a neat finish you can use a plastic grout finishing tool, or just your forefinger to smooth the grout so it has a fine finish.   Finally use a cloth to polish off any grout left on the tiles before it totally sets.

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Tiles before they are grouted

THE END RESULT…

 

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